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Eastern Mexico in the Mid-19th Century

Eastern Mexico in the Mid-19th Century

Veracruz, on the eastern coast of Mexico, was a gateway for both adventurers and goods flowing into and out of the country’s interior. A German settlement called El Mirador was established in the fertile highlands above the old port town. Botanical specimens collected at El Mirador were sent to leading European museums. Reports of new and undiscovered plant specimens proved irresistible to Lindheimer. His friends, the Friedrich brothers, had accompanied him to Veracruz and bought land for a coffee plantation and gristmill. Lindheimer first collected plants and lived off the land but later took employment managing a distillery. He remained at El Mirador for 1½ years and later described it as “one of the most beautiful areas of the earth.” Restlessness again overtook him as he realized El Mirador would never bring him fortune. Texas independence might.

More Information

  • Hale, Douglas: Wanderers Between Two Worlds, Xlibris, 2005


Lindheimer’s Texas Partners: Sophienburg Museum and ArchivesHumanities TexasNative Plant Society of TexasMissouri Botanical GardenNew Braunfels Heritage VillageNew Braunfels Conservation SocietyNew Braunfels Independent School District